The Mountains of Morpheus

The Mountains of Morpheus are a mystical realm, where sleep brings strange, enchanted dreams that can unlock the mind’s potential and drive mad the bravest of souls. Perhaps in other parts of this world, they are fable and rumor; in Drau-Mura, they are reality. The supernatural effect of dreams is called, by some, Morpheus’s Grip.

The mind of a typical mortal can tolerate Morpheus’s Grip for two to three weeks, though given its unpredictable effects and the Mountains’ own hazards, one may well perish before that point. Anyone who stays in the Mountains for too long will die, go mad, be possessed by a specter, or (most likely) transform into a gnoll.

Monsters and Other Curiosities

Gnolls are the hyena-headed monsters that are, in this campaign, unique to the Mountains of Morpheus. When a person spends too much time in the Mountains, she eventually transforms into a gnoll, losing her identity and becoming a bloodthirsty, sadistic monster. While wicked in the extreme, gnolls demonstrate a small-group cooperation that rivals that of any well-trained military squad. Their long-term goals, if any, are unknown, but they do attack travelers through the Mountains, and occasionally raid nearby settlements.

Facing gnolls is terrible; joining them is worse. Though wantonly violent in combat, they capture the survivors, forcing their transformation into gnolls themselves. Occasionally, a person transforms instead into a powerful minotaur, though apparently remains a gnoll in mindset and behavior. Most gnolls are competent at stealth, tracking, basic medicine, and taming animals, though in other respects they are of apparent low intellect. A minority of gnolls have magical talent, displaying use of spells known to druids, rangers, and sorcerers; it is unclear whether they learn or re-learn magic in ways similar to mortals.

Specters are malevolent spirits, among the most feared of monsters in Drau-Mura. Although they are insubstantial and physically harmless, they can invade the body of a dreaming person, taking possession of it immediately — or at a later opportunity. They are patient, intelligent, and insidious; a person may not realize she is possessed until weeks later, after she has returned from the Mountains of Morpheus. Few mortals can match a specter’s lust for mayhem and gore — and few mortals can match their diverse, formidable arcane powers.

Wyverns, worgs, and giant spiders dwell throughout the Mountains, and can be found elsewhere in Drau-Mura. They they are motivated by appetite and territory more than anything else, and have few qualms about attacking mortals (besides an advantage in numbers). Undead, elementals, and nature spirits such as dryads hold vigil in caverns and ruins in the Mountains; they are often non-violent until directly bothered. Many adventurers speculate they are long-standing guardians of … well, something probably worth guarding or stealing.

Malkavians are not monsters, but simply humans and other people whose minds have been broken by Morpheus’s Grip: Usually, they are travelers who stayed too long in the Mountains, but managed to leave before becoming gnolls. Their variety of madness varies a lot: Most suffer from a spate of phobias, anxiety, and depression, but some are severely psychotic or violent. Malkavians are social pariahs, and rarely fare well — often thanks merely to prejudice and others’ fear. Their dreams are constantly intense and chaotic, and are believed by some to be prophetic and oracular. The more superstitious (… or better informed) listen carefully to the ravings of a local Malkavian. Many people in Drau-Mura, however, believe that to directly converse with a Malkavian is risk “contamination” by their madness.

Very little is known about the Orvahii (which literally means “absent”), since they have thought to be extinct for many ages. They were some kind of intelligent race that once dwelled in the Mountains of Morpheus, and built vast, subterranean labyrinths and temples — some of which are not all that inaccessible, and have been thoroughly looted for centuries. When adventurers talk about seeking out the treasures of a lost dungeon in the Mountains of Morpheus, they are most often talking about something the Orvahii built.

Sometimes, adventurers do find haunted treasure in the Mountains of Morpheus — not hidden away in some dungeon, but simply out in the open. They are often reluctant to take such easy pickings, for reasons that they might be cursed, or otherwise supernaturally dangerous. On the other hand, the coins on some long-dead person are sometimes just coins.

Immunities to Morpheus’s Grip

Animals, wyverns, gnolls, undead, and all other manner of lucky creatures seem entirely immune to any degree of dreaming. Elves are affected by Morpheus’s Grip in the same way that humans and other mortals are, though they require only four hours of “sleep,” as normal.

Storytelling Morpheus’s Grip

Once per session, the DM will use the following three tables to generate the dreams of player characters (PCs). PCs start using the Mild Dreaming table, but in time “upgrade” to the Intense Dreaming, and eventually the Extreme Dreaming tables.

If a PC has experienced any effect on the Extreme Dreaming table, she does not roll for dreams during the next session. The effects of Extreme Dreaming are just too significant to stack up over multiple game sessions.

It takes three full days of rest outside the Mountains of Morpheus to fully reset the “timer.” that determines the severity of dreaming. (This is full-day, luxurious rest; traveling or intense activity simply prolongs one’s required rest.) Dreaming only happens within the Mountains — you can’t carry the effect of Morpheus’s Grip with you. So for example, if a PC has traveled 10 days in the Mountains, you would eventually go from Mild Dreaming to Intense Dreaming. Three days of rest at a local village outside the Mountains would return you to a normal state, and you would have Mild Dreaming on your next sleep in the Mountains.

The players and the GM should know that these tables represent a game device, to be used once per session. They don’t fully describe or confine the full range of what can happen in Morpheus’s Grip to every single person in the game world. They shouldn’t be regarded as a “scientific” description of the influence of the Mountains, though they do represent the dangerous diversity of Morpheus’s Grip.

Mild Dreaming

Use if you have been traveling in the Mountains of Morpheus for 7 days or less. After seven days of mild dreaming, use the Intense Dreaming table.

Roll d%:

1-30: “Normal” sleep: Your dreams are more intense and colorful versions of your normal dreams. (“Normal” sleep accompanies table results that don’t describe your dreams.)
31: You levitate in your sleep.
32: You sleep with your eyes open; they glow, the light equivalent to an lantern’s.
33: You sleepwalk, performing some harmless, repetitive action, e.g. washing your hands.
34-35: You sleepwalk, wandering aimlessly for the next 1d4 hours.
36: Lightweight objects levitate and slowly revolve around your head as you sleep.
37-45: You talk in your sleep. Roll a d10: 1-2: You talk about your Ideal in detail; 3-4: You talk about your Bond in detail; 5-6: You talk about your Flaw in detail; 7-8: You talk about your background and personal history in detail; 9: You talk about all previous items; 10: You talk about one of the previous items and reveal a personal secret.
46-50: Vibrant, invigorating dreams. You have advantage on any one roll this session.
51-55: Nightmares. You have disadvantage on any one roll of the GM’s choice this session.
56-58: Your feverish dreams exhaust your body. A long rest heals only hit points equal to your level. If you use your Hit Dice to recover hit points, treat all of them as if they had a result of 1. This lasts until the end of this session.
59-60: You gain temporary hit points equal to three times your level. These last for the rest of the game session, or until you gain temporary hit points from another source.
61-64: Violent, paranoid dreams that spur you to pick a fight with NPCs. You gain an additional 10% XP from combat encounters, so long as they’re lethal, or close to lethal.
65-68: Empowering, ecstatic dreams. You may take a feat, which lasts until the end of the session.
69-72: Mentally enervating dreams that confuse the senses. You have disadvantage on Intelligence and Wisdom checks for the next 24 hours or so.
73-77: In your dreams, you battle phantasmagorical monsters, which inflict on you very real, physical wounds. After receiving the benefits of rest, you take 4d6 damage, but cannot be reduced past 1 hit point this way. Roll a d10: 1-4: Damage is slashing and piercing; 5: Damage is poison 6: Damage is fire; 7: Damage is necrotic; 8: Damage is psychic; 9: Damage is cold; 10: Damage is a mix of any of the previous two.
78: No dreams at all. Upon waking, without knowing why, you utter a prophetic statement.
79: Morbid dreams. The next day, when you next look at a corpse, you learn some information about its person.
80-81: In your dreams you explore your own psyche, traveling through hallways of memories, landscapes of emotions, labyrinths of ideas. When you wake, you gain some insight about yourself or the world. Gain a 20% XP bonus this session.
82-84: As above, but you may suddenly change your Ideal, Bond or Flaw (as long as it represents an internal, psychological change). Only gain the XP bonus if you do.
85-86: Dreams exploring another person’s psyche and history. You may make a Charisma roll to select a specific person; the DC ranges from 10 to 25, depending on your existing intimacy. The GM may call for Intelligence or skill rolls to determine how much information you gain.
87-88: Dreams in which you witness a past event. You may make a Intelligence roll to select a specific event; the DC ranges from 10 to 25, depending on your own closeness to it and the “size” of the event. The GM may call for Intelligence or skill rolls to determine how much information you gain.
89: You dream you live another life, causing a confusion of identity. You may lose proficiency in a Skill and gain proficiency in another Skill.† This effect is permanent, though it could be reversed by a similar effect.
90: You dream you live another life, causing a confusion of identity. You may lose proficiency in four Skills, and gain proficiency in two new Skills, which cannot be those lost.† This effect lasts until the end of this session. If you do, gain a 20% XP bonus this session.
91-92: You dream you live another life. You may gain proficiency in a Skill, until the end of the next session.†
93-94: Terrible, terrible nightmares, whose effects echo on your mind and body while awake. You are afflicted with an minor oneiric bane (see below). Once per session, the GM may trigger the oneiric bane, probably during happen or some suitably dramatic moment. Roll a d8 to determine the specific effect.
95: You have obsessive dreams of a specific item (or place, or stimulus). If you obtain it within three sessions (including this one), all PCs gain a 30% XP bonus on that session (or some commensurate benefit). Your dream gives you hints of the item’s location or nature, but not the means to directly acquire it. No one can have this effect multiple times.
96: You can’t shake the feeling, in your dreams, that someone is watching you. Actually, an existing NPC does dream of you and your activities in the past three days or so. You and the dreamer may make opposed Charisma checks for you to protect your psychic privacy.
97-98: Dreams of spiritual transcendence, oneness with nature, or encountering gods and otherworldly beings of vast and unknowable power. Treat as the commune, commune with nature, contact other plane, or divination spell (your choice). This costs XP, in the form of 30% of the XP you gain this session.
99: Your dreams are linked. If anyone gets this result, ignore all other results (except an Intense or Extreme Dreaming result with linked dreams). Then roll again, and treat all dreaming PCs with you as if they had that result.
00: Very intense dreams. Make a Wisdom saving throw (DC 15); if you succeed, you may either roll again on this table, or begin using the Intense Dreaming table next session (with no other result). If you fail, begin using the Intense Dreaming table next session.

Intense Dreaming

Characters in Intense Dreaming are walking a dangerous line. The psychic benefits and hazards are both greater. After 17 days of Intense Dreaming, use the Extreme Dreaming table.

Roll d%:

1-6: Roll twice on the Mild Dreaming table. Take the higher result.
7-11: Dreams and visions imbue you with magical power. Choose one spell of levels 1 through 3. This game session, you can cast that spell four times if it is a 1st-level spell; twice if it is a 2nd-level spell; and once if it is a 3rd-level spell. You don’t need spell components to cast this spell, except any material components worth 20 gp or greater and that would be consumed in casting the spell. (Example: You don’t need components for identify, but you would for revivify.) Alternately, if you are a bard, ranger, or sorcerer, you may permanently forget one spell you know, and learn a new one. If you are a wizard, you may learn a 1st-level spell. Any benefits conferred by the spell don’t last past this game session. (Don’t dither too much in picking a spell. If you can’t pick one within about 15 minutes of real time then roll d8: 1: charm person; 2: cure wounds; 3: dissonant whispers; 4: detect thoughts; 5: lesser restoration; 6: shatter; 7: fear; 8: sending.)
12: You have obsessive dreams of a specific item (or place, or stimulus). If you obtain it within three sessions (including this one), all PCs gain a 30% XP bonus on that session (or some commensurate benefit). Your dreams give you hints of the item’s location or nature but do not confer total knowledge. No one can have this condition multiple times.
13: You gain temporary hit points equal to five times your level. These last for the rest of the game session, or until you gain temporary hit points from another source.
14: Your dreams endow you with a marvelous , but temporary, creativity. When you wake, you may spend 10-20 minutes magically creating an object of worth of up to 20 lbs. in weight and up to about 50 gp in worth. No tools are necessary; you merely mold existing matter to your will. You can’t create life or magical items.
15: Your dreams link to those of another, through which you may shape that person’s dreams. Treat as the dream spell, but without the option to cause nightmares.
16: Dreams of a certain NPC. As you sleep, you slowly exhale a thin, white mist, which over 2d4 hours coalesces, then suddenly transforms into a being looking exactly like the person of whom you dreamed. Who this “doppleganger” is not clear to you; you’ll pretty much have to play through this encounter to find out what it’s about. The DM has a table of the doppleganger’s identity, and will roll randomly to determine it.
17-23: Dreams and visions imbue you with magical power. The next time you benefit from a long rest, you can add an additional spell slot for your highest spell level. If you aren’t a spellcaster, you may gain the Magic Initiate feat, which lasts for the rest of game session. Alternately, if you are a bard, ranger, or sorcerer, you may permanently forget one spell you know, and learn a new one.
24: A symbol or image repeats in your dreams. It is surely significant, thought it is not necessarily obvious why.
25: No dreams at all. Upon waking, without knowing why, you utter a prophetic statement.
26-30: Dreams full of premonitions, auguries, and omens. You may gain information, as if you benefited from the divination spell.
31-35: Dreams of spiritual transcendence, oneness with nature, or encountering gods and otherworldly beings of vast and unknowable power. Treat as the commune, commune with nature, or contact other plane spell (your choice).
36: As above, but you may choose the legend lore spell too. If you choose commune, you may ask one question and are not limited to yes/no questions.
37: Empowering, ecstatic dreams. You may take a feat, which lasts until the end of the session.
38-40: Empowering, ecstatic dreams. For this game session, one of your class features improves in some way. Examples: Barbarian: Rage damage bonus increases by +1. Bard: Bardic Inspiration die increases by +1. Clerics, druids: Extra spell slot at highest and second-highest level. Fighter: A weapon you wield is a +1 weapon in your hands only. Monk: Increase Ki Points by one. Paladin: Lay on Hands healing pool becomes seven times your level. Ranger: You can use Primeval Awareness once per day without consuming a spell slot; or learn a new spell. Rogue: Gain Expertise in a new Skill. Sorcerers, warlocks: Learn a new spell. Wizards: Learn a new spell at a spell level you can access, but this is permanent.
41: Empowering, ecstatic dreams. As above, but lasts until the end of the next session. Wizards: Learn a second new spell at a lower level than the first spell’s level; this is also permanent.
42: In your dreams you explore your own psyche, traveling through hallways of memories, landscapes of emotions, labyrinths of ideas. When you wake, you gain some insight about yourself or the world. Gain a 30% XP bonus this session.
43-45: Clairvoyant dreams. Choose a result form the Mild Dreaming table that is 79-91.
46-48: Insightful dreams. You become proficient in a Skill, a type of item, or language until the end of the next session.
49-52: Psychologically transformative dreams. You must choose one: (1) Lose proficiency in a Skill, and gain proficiency in another; (2) If you are a bard, ranger, sorcerer, warlock, or wizard, lose one spell known, then learn a new spell of the same level; (3) Change your Ideal, Bond, or Flaw (as long as it represents an internal, psychological change); (4) Lose an important memory; (5) Take a 50% XP penalty this session; (6) Change your sub-class (this may take some work and discussion with the GM).
53-56: As above, but the choice is optional. If you do, gain a 30% XP bonus this session .
57-58: You dream of someone, and of their dreaming of you. A supernatural psychic link between you two is created, and you and the other party may speak, as well as gain information from the other, requiring opposed Wisdom or Charisma rolls; use Charisma to “attack,” use Wisdom to “defend,” and use Intelligence for “initiative” and escape. You may make a Charisma roll to select a specific person; the DC ranges from 10 to 25, depending on your existing intimacy. Otherwise, roll a d6 to determine the person. 1. An NPC you personally know, of your choice. 2. An NPC you have met, of your choice. 3. An NPC within about 50 miles of your location, GM’s choice. 4. A monster or supernatural being, GM’s choice. 5. An enemy, GM’s choice. 6. A nearby NPC.
59-62: In your dreams, you battle phantasmagorical monsters, which inflict on you very real, physical wounds. After receiving the benefits of rest, you take 6d6 damage, but cannot be reduced past 1 hit point this way. You may make a Constitution or Wisdom saving throw to halve the damage. Roll a d10: 1-4: Damage is slashing and piercing; 5: Damage is poison 6: Damage is fire; 7: Damage is necrotic; 8: Damage is psychic; 9: Damage is cold; 10: Damage is a mix of any of the previous two.
63: Horrid, exhausting nightmares. You cannot regain your Hit Dice in healing this session.
64-71: Terrible, terrible nightmares, whose effects echo on your mind and body while awake. You are afflicted with an minor oneiric bane (see below). Once per session, the GM may trigger the oneiric bane, probably during happen or some suitably dramatic moment. Roll a d8 to determine the specific effect.
72: Vigorous, lycanthropic dreams, experiencing a wild animal’s hunt. In reality, you sleepwalk and attack anyone near you; you have advantage on all attack rolls, but are unable to use magic. The dream ends when you take over half your hit points in damage.
73-74: Your feverish dreams exhaust your body. A long rest heals only hit points equal to your level. If you use hit dice to recover hit points, treat all of them with a result of 1. This effect lasts until the end of the session.
75-77: Dreams of loss and lessness. Lose proficiency in a Skill, language, or tool until the end of the session.
78-79: Dreams of loss and lessness. Lose a feat, or proficiency in two Skills until the end of the session.
80: Dreams of loss and lessness. Lose or reduce a class feature this session: Barbarian: Can only rage once this session. Bard: Treat all Bardic Inspiration dice as results of 1. Cleric, Paladin: Can only Channel Divinity once this session. Druid: Can only use Wild Shape once this session. Fighter: Cannot use Second Wind or Action Surge. Monk: Ki points and ki point maximum are reduced by 2. Ranger: Can’t benefit from Natural Explorer and Primeval Awareness. Rogue: Can’t use Cunning Action and Uncanny Dodge. Sorcerer: Sorcery points and sorcery point maximum are reduced by 2. Warlock: Lose an Eldritch Invocation. Wizard: Can’t cast spells as rituals; can use Arcane Recovery once this session.
81-85: Terrible, terrible nightmares, whose effects echo on your mind and body while awake. You are afflicted with an major oneiric bane (see below). Once per session, the GM may trigger the oneiric bane, probably during combat or some suitably dramatic moment. Roll a d8 to determine the specific effect.
86: You can’t shake the feeling, in your dreams, that someone is watching you. Actually, an existing NPC does dream of you and your activities in the past three days or so. You and the dreamer may make opposed Charisma checks for you to protect your psychic privacy.
87-88: The idea that you should kill any mortals you encounter in the Mountains of Morpheus becomes very reasonable to you. At the same time, the idea that you should assist any gnolls who find you becomes very reasonable to you. Although this effect in no way compels your behavior, you do suffer disadvantage on initiative and attack rolls against gnolls (and their allies). This effect ends when five initiative or attack rolls have been disadvantaged; rolls already disadvantaged for another reason don’t count.
89: You gain wisdom from otherworldly, possibly demonic sources. They contradict each other. Treat as the commune, but you may ask one question and are not limited to yes/no questions; or the legend lore spell. You receive multiple answers, and some of them may not be truthful, or at least fail to have your best interests at heart. Making contact with such powers is disturbing, and after dreaming you take 1d8 psychic damage (Intelligence or Wisdom saving throw halves, DC 12). You can’t be reduced below 1 hp this way.
90-91: You are visited by a specter, an invisible and incorporeal monster rumored to possess people and drive them to acts of mayhem. They’re also rumored to know many secrets. The specter attempts to negotiate with you. You may attempt to will it away, requiring a Charisma saving throw (DC 15); you may attempt to do so once per long rest. However, the specter may also magically harm you, inflicting 6d6 psychic damage (Wisdom saving throw halves, DC 15), once per long rest.
92-94: In your dreams, you battle phantasmagorical monsters, which inflict on you very real, physical wounds. After receiving the benefits of rest, you take 9d6 damage, but cannot be reduced past 1 hit point this way. You may make a Constitution or Wisdom saving throw (DC 20) to halve the damage. Roll a d10: 1-4: Damage is slashing and piercing; 5: Damage is poison 6: Damage is fire; 7: Damage is necrotic; 8: Damage is psychic; 9: Damage is cold; 10: Damage is a mix of any of the previous two.
95-98: Terrible nightmares. The GM may give you disadvantage on any three rolls this session.
99: Your dreams are linked. If anyone gets this result, ignore all other results (except an Intense or Extreme Dreaming result with linked dreams). Then roll again; the result affects everyone with whom you’re traveling.
00: Extremely intense dreams. Make a Wisdom saving throw (DC 15); if you succeed, you may either roll again on this table, or begin using the Extreme Dreaming table next session (with no other result). If you fail, begin using the Extreme Dreaming table next session.

Extreme Dreaming

Characters in Extreme Dreaming sleep at their own mortal peril, and risk their companions’ well-being. The rewards are potentially great, but dream alone may incur a fate worse than death.

Roll d%:
1: What remarkable power you gain! You have empowering, ecstatic visions. You may raise an ability score by 1, up to a maximum of 20. A player character can only benefit from this result twice in the campaign, ever.
2: What remarkable power you gain! You have empowering, ecstatic visions. You may gain a benefit related to your class, which lasts until the end of the next session. When you reach 5th level (or if you are 5th level or higher), you can pay 5,000 XP to make this benefit permanent. You need to have 5,000 “available” XP above your level threshold to spend. See the list below for class benefits. A player character can only benefit from this result once in the campaign, ever. This includes the similar table results (#3-18).
3-4: You suffer terrible dreams of tribulation and enlightenment. Mental agony torches your psyche, washing away your personality and talents. Until the end of the next session , your proficiency bonus is reduced to +0, and you gain an oneiric handicap (see the table below). After that, you may gain the benefits of Extreme Dreaming #1 or #2. While you have this condition, you cannot be effected by Morpheus’s Grip in any way, except for transforming into a gnoll.
4-5: You suffer terrible dreams of tribulation and enlightenment. Your body resists the benefits of rest, and acts erratically: cardiac arrhythmia, increased blood pressure, indigestion, intense sweating, and so on. Each time after gaining the benefits of a long rest, you take 4d10 damage (Constitution saving throw halves, DC 20). This damage cannot be reduced or prevented, though it can be healed. It can reduce you to 0 hit points. Keep track of how much damage you take this way. When you have take 50 damage this way, you can choose to end this effect or continue to suffer. When you have taken 100 damage in this way, you may gain the benefits of Extreme Dreaming #1 or #2; you keep on taking damage until you succeed on that Constitution saving throw referred to above. While you have this condition, you cannot be effected by Morpheus’s Grip in any way, except for transforming into a gnoll.
6-7: You suffer terrible dreams of tribulation and enlightenment. Your identity, memories, and ego begin to crumble and drift away. Immediately, you lose proficiency in two skills. Beginning next session, you gain an oneiric handicap. The second after this session, you experience no losses. Beginning the third session after this session, your oneiric handicap disappears. You may then gain proficiency in two skills; or gain proficiency in one skill and gain the benefits of Extreme Dreaming #1-2. While you have this condition, you cannot be effected by Morpheus’s Grip in any way, except for transforming into a gnoll.
8-10: You dream — anxiously, but not violently — of your dark double, a being with a sort of “shadow personality” representing the dimensions of your personality that you repress or refuse to acknowledge. (Or, if you are just psychologically shallow, a personality opposite of yours.) This dark double becomes real. As you sleep, you slowly exhale a thin, black mist, which over 2d4 hours coalesces, then suddenly transforms into a doppelganger of yourself, or alternately, some kind of “spirit animal.” If you successfully defeat it, you may gain the benefits of Extreme Dreaming #1-2, beginning the next session. Should another character aid you against this foe, another doppelganger appears to join the fight.
11: You have obsessive dreams of a specific, rare item. (The GM will explain the details.) Should you ever acquire this item and dream in the Mountains of Morpheus when it’s in your possession, you may gain the benefits of Extreme Dreaming #1-4. Other PCs gain a 10% XP bonus (or some commensurate benefit) the session you acquire the item.
12-13: Your dreams endow you with powerful though temporary magic of conjuration and knowledge. When you wake, you may spend 10 minutes to an hour shaping matter to your will, magically creating an object of worth of up to 100 lbs. in weight, up to about 500 gp in worth, and up to about an bull’s size in volume. Depending on the item, this may involve an Intelligence or Skill check.
14: Your dreams endow you with powerful though temporary magic of conjuration and knowledge. When you wake, you may create life or magical items. You can magically conjure a creature (reference the Monster Manual) of Challenge Rating 1 or lower to serve you this session.
15-17: Dreams of a certain NPC. As you sleep, you slowly exhale a thin, white mist, which over 2d4 hours coalesces, then suddenly transforms into a being looking exactly like the person of whom you dreamed. Who this “doppleganger” is not clear to you; you’ll pretty much have to play through this encounter to find out what it’s about. The DM has a table of the doppleganger’s identity, and will roll randomly to determine it.
18-20: Roll three times on Mild or Intense Dreaming; choose a result.
21-25: Dreams of spiritual transcendence, oneness with nature, or encountering gods and otherworldly beings of vast and unknowable power. Treat as the commune, commune with nature, contact other plane, divination, or legend lore spell (your choice). Also gain a 15% XP bonus this session.
26-29: Roll three times on Intense Dreaming; take the highest result. Ignore results of 99 or 00.
30-32: Psychically traumatizing nightmares. You have disadvantage on Intelligence and Wisdom checks (includes skill checks, but not attack rolls or saving throws).†† You gain some form of mental debility, but this is a role-play consideration. It doesn’t have a game effect (and shouldn’t be used to trip up the whole group of PCs).
33-34: Psychically traumatizing nightmares, and a gain of a strange, radical insight. This is the same as the above result. In addition, pick one of the following Skills: Arcana, History, Investigation, Medicine, Nature, or Religion. Your proficiency bonus is doubled with this skill. This benefit is redundant with a Bard or Rogue’s Expertise ability, and does not stack for the same skill.††
35-38: Vigorous, lycanthropic dreams, experiencing a wild animal’s hunt. In reality, you sleepwalk and attack anyone near you; you have advantage on all attack rolls and saving throws. You are not obliged to use spell slots, ki points, or other limited-use abilities, but you do use the most direct, effective way of attacking the person nearest to you. Under certain conditions (time passing, taking a certain threshold of damage), you may make an Intelligence saving throw (DC 20) to end this effect. What exact conditions are not obvious to you.
39-70: Strangely peaceful dreams, ending with the feeling of being seized by an outside force. Your transformation into a gnoll begins. Make a Constitution or Wisdom saving throw (DC 20), and make one saving throw every 24 hours that you are within the Mountains of Morpheus. When you fail three of these saving throws, the transformation is complete, and your previous identity is lost.
71-80: Strangely peaceful dreams, ending with the feeling that something has “attached” itself to your soul. You are possessed by a specter, a ghostly monster that sporadically seizes control of your body, driving you to great acts of violence. You may make a Charisma saving throw (DC 20) every 24 hours, after possession, to attempt to eject the specter.
91-95: The destruction and reconstruction of your mortal identity. Make one of these changes immediately: (1) Change your Ideal; (2) Change your Bond; (3) Change your Flaw; (4) Lose a Skill, then gain a new Skill; (5) Lose two Skills, then gain two new Skills. (1), (2), and (3) should represent internal, psychological changes. Every 24 hours in the Mountains of Morpheus, make a Wisdom or Charisma saving throw (DC 18); if you fail, make another change that you previously haven’t made.
96: In your dreams, you battle phantasmagorical monsters, which inflict on you very real, physical wounds. After receiving the benefits of rest, you take 10d10 damage; if you reach 0 hit points this way, you immediately stabilize. You may make a Constitution or Wisdom saving throw (DC 22) to halve the damage. Roll a d10: 1-4: Damage is slashing and piercing; 5: Damage is poison 6: Damage is fire; 7: Damage is necrotic; 8: Damage is psychic; 9: Damage is cold; 10: Damage is a mix of any of the previous two.
97: You dream of an unusual presence in your stomach. When you wake, you experience severe stomach pains over the next several days. Each day, you take 1d10 damage and your travel speed is slowed, but cannot be reduced past 1 hit point this way; also make a Constitution saving throw (DC 20). On a success, the pains end as you vomit up a magical item.
98: Empowering, ecstatic dreams. Gain feat, which lasts until the end of next session.
99: You suffer terrible dreams of tribulation — and then you are at last free from the eldritch powers of the Mountains. Each time you gain the benefits of a long rest, you take 2d10 damage; you may make a Constitution saving throw (DC 20) to halve the damage. Keep track of how much damage you take this way. When you have taken 60 damage in this way, you gain a 15% XP bonus this session, and become immune to all dreaming effects on this table. (There may be some way to re-open yourself to the dreaming effects, but it is beyond the scope of this table to describe.)
00: Your dreams are linked. If anyone gets this result, ignore all other results. Then roll again; the result affects everyone with whom you’re traveling.

†† This effect lasts until you have spent at least 48 consecutive hours resting outside the Mountains of Morpheus.

Class benefits (from Extreme Dreaming table):

  • Barbarian: A barbarian experiences primal, empowering dreams, where she comes face-to-face with a personification of her emotions and battle-rage, becoming able to wield them without taming them. Increase your number of rages by 1, and your rage duration lasts to 2 minutes.
  • Bard: A bard wakes from musical dreams with newfound talents, suddenly capable of playing tunes of which he had never heard before. You gain proficiency in an additional musical instrument. Add a plus-1 to all Bardic Inspiration dice you provide; or your list of spells known increases by 1.
  • Cleric: A cleric is met with visions of her deity. Your list of prepared spells increases by 2. You may change your Divine Domain (possibly signifying a religious epiphany or conversion experience); this change is immediately permanent.
  • Druid: A druid receives harmonious, transcendent dreams of oneness with the primal world. Your list of prepared spells increases by 2; or you can use Wild Shape four times before a short or long rest.
  • Fighter: A fighter dreams of fighting for days and nights on an endless, furious battlefield; the experience can be full of terror and clarity, leaving her with new insights about her talents at killing people. Your Second Wind result increases by your Constitution modifier; or any one weapon you wield is a plus-1 weapon as long as you wield it. You may change your Fighting Style; this change is immediately permanent.
  • Monk: A monk’s dreams are peaceful, orderly, disciplined — the experience is almost like a lucid dreaming of nigh-perfect focus. Your maximum number of Ki Points increases by 1.
  • Paladin: A paladin dreams of righteous angels and oaths, scouring her of doubt and fear. Depending on the person, this can turn her into a selfless champion or a merciless fanatic. Your Lay on Hands healing pool is now equal to your paladin level x 6; or the bonus conferred by your Aura of Protection is now equal to your Charisma modifier plus 1.
  • Ranger: Rangers have dreams similar to those of barobarians and druids, entering unfamiliar landscapes of great beauty and danger. Gain another Favored Terrain; or your list of spells known increases by 1.
  • Rogue: Rogues increase in competence and cunning. Gain Expertise in a new Skill ; or noce per session, you may use d8s for a single Sneak Attack instead of d6s.
  • Sorcerer: Sorcerers have intense, wild dreams, their veins brimming with magical power; they may even dream they that are the mighty wyrms from which they descend. Your pool of Sorcery Points increases by 1; or your list of spells known increases by 1. You may also forget one spell and learn a new one; this change is immediately permanent.
  • Warlocks: Warlocks perhaps have the most nightmarish dreams of all, for coming into direct with one’s patron is rarely a pleasant experience. Even more the patron may make demands of him — though what warlock could refuse the lure of even greater power? Your list of spells known increases by 1.
  • Wizard: A wizard dreams of arcane omniscience and omnipotence, wielding the orbit of planets in his palm and fashioning cities and mountains per his whim. The experience is fleeting, but the power it confers is real enough. Upon waking, you may add 4 levels of new spells into your spellbook (e.g., a 4th-level spell; or a 2nd-level spell and two 1st-level spells).

Alternately, you may choose an appropriate charm (see Dungeon Master’s Guide, p. 228), using one of the examples or coming up with one of your own.

† In place of gaining a Skill proficiency, you may gain a proficiency with an item; or learn a new language.

Banes and Benefits of Dreaming

An oneiric bane is a negative, temporary effect of dreaming: a sort of curse that is triggered after the dream. Oneiric banes are typically treated as the effects of spells. Minor oneiric banes are not usually lethal themselves, but they can occur at inopportune moments. Major oneiric banes merit greater consideration.

Unless otherwise noted, “spells” are cast at their normal spell level, e.g. treat dissonant whispers as a level-one spell. If concentration is part of a spell’s duration, e.g. tasha’s hideous laughter, then the “concentration” cannot be broken, but lasts to the maximum duration.

Table of minor oneiric banes

To select randomly, roll a d8:

  • 1: Imaginary demeaning voices. Treat as vicious mockery DC 12. If you succeed on the saving throw, repeat the effect the next round.
  • 2: Horrible mental pain. Treat as dissonant whispers, DC 13, direction is as far away from the nearest enemy or threat.
  • 3: Horrible mental pain. Treat as tasha’s hideous laughter, DC 13.
  • 4: Imaginary restraints: Treat as entangle, DC 13, but affecting only you and the restraints are imaginary. You may make either Intelligence or Strength saving throws versus this effect. When you succeed on a saving throw, the restraints disappear.
  • 5: Loss of vision: Treat as blindness/deafness, DC 14, with the blindness option. You may make either a Constitution or Wisdom saving throw versus this effect.
  • 6: Sheer terror: Treat as fear, DC 15, frightened of the nearest enemy or threat.
  • 7: Time appears to slow down. Treat as slow, DC 15, but for only five rounds.
  • 8: Lurid, bedazzling flashbacks. Make a Constitution or Wisdom save, DC 15. If you fail, you are stunned for one round.

Table of major oneiric banes

If needed, roll a d8:

  • 1: Disease. Make a Wisdom saving throw, DC 20. On a failure, you suffer the effects of the contagion spell, DC 17. Roll randomly to determine the specific disease.
  • 2: Spastic loss of control of body. Treat as Otto’s irresistible dance, DC 20.
  • 3: Paralysis. Your body stiffens, and when it can no longer move, it becomes immobile. Make a Constitution saving throw, DC 20. One a failure, you are restrained, and must repeat the saving throw at the end ofyour next turn. On a success, you are no longer restrained. On a failure, you are paralyzed for about (1d8 times 1d8) hours; if the result is 64, you are paralyzed instead for a few days. The GM rolls for the duration in secret.
  • 4: Narcolepsy. Make a Constitution saving throw, DC 20. On a failure, you fall asleep. You wake up if you take any damage, or if someone else uses its action to shake you awake.
  • 5: Temporary violent madness. Treat as crown of madness, DC 14, attacking the nearest friend or foe. Roll randomly if friends and foes are equally close to you. You may make a saving throw at the end of each of your turns to end this effect.
  • 6: Compulsive confession. Make a Charisma saving throw, DC 20. On a failure, you are affected by a zone of truth. The zone is centered on you, and affects only you.
  • 7: Selective blindness. Make an Intelligence saving throw, DC 20. On a failure, you are unable to perceive one enemy, as if it benefitted from the greater invisibility spell, except it is not perceptible to any of your senses—. This lasts for about one minute.
  • 8: Any of the above, but worse. Roll a d6. On 1-4, randomly pick a minor oneiric bane, increasing all DCs by 5. On a 5-6, randomly pick a major oneiric bane, increasing all DCs by 2.

The Mountains of Morpheus

The Mountains of Morpheus Dssong Dssong